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U-M ranks seventh for Peace Corps Paul D. Coverdell Fellows

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

U-M ranks No. 7 in the nation as a Peace Corps Paul D. Coverdell Fellows university in the 2013 rankings of top Peace Corps Master's International and Coverdell Fellows graduate schools.

U-M has 20 Returned Peace Corps Volunteers currently enrolled in the Coverdell Fellows graduate program.

The Coverdell Fellows Program provides returned volunteers with scholarships, academic credit, and stipends to earn an advanced degree after they complete their Peace Corps service along with professional internships helping underserved American communities. The Peace Corps Master's International program allows students to earn their graduate degree while serving in the Peace Corps. U-M offers both Peace Corps Fellows and Master's International programs.

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Open House photo booth images online

Friday, May 3, 2013

Visit the Ford School's Flickr page to view and download photos from Friday's 2013 Graduation Open House. Directions for downloading will be in the album description field. Enjoy!

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An engaged citizen

Monday, April 22, 2013

Barry Rabe on the future of CLOSUP

A six-inch bobblehead of Ron Swanson, director of a fictitious Midwestern parks department in the NBC sitcom Parks and Recreation, dominates the meeting table in Barry Rabe's office. The bobblehead is something of an enigma.

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You can get there from here

Monday, April 22, 2013

RTA Board representative Elisabeth R. Gerber sees the possibilities transit can offer for Southeast Michigan-and for the region's hardest hit city

Getting from Detroit to Ann Arbor is a trip in more ways than one. The two cities are 43 miles apart. But the expense and inconvenience of driving deters many from making the trip. Trains and buses run daily, but the schedules are slim and the costs prohibitive for the average commuter.

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All in the game

Monday, April 22, 2013

An interdisciplinary approach to urban policy

"Aw yeah. That golden rule." -Bunk Moreland

Dirty and disheveled, Dukie rocks up to his crew in an alley somewhere off Franklin Street in West Baltimore. It's the last day of a long, hot summer, eighth grade looming like a threat. Namond notices Dukie's black eye, courtesy of boys from a rival neighborhood. "What happened to you?" he shouts. "Those Terrace boys banged me coming off the train tracks over there by Ramsay Street," Dukie says. Little Randy pipes up, "They can't whip on Dukie like that." Namond concurs: "Nah, only we can whip on Dukie like that."

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Putting out the flames: from the health of cities to the health care industry

Monday, April 22, 2013

In the summer of 1967, James B. Hudak (MPP '71) watched Detroit burn. He was between his sophomore and junior years as an undergraduate at Yale. A friend got him a summer job working the night shift at a Chrysler assembly plant in Detroit. He lived with a bunch of guys in a rental on Lake St. Clair. At the end of July, at night, he looked across the lake from his home and saw Detroit in flames. He watched giant troop transports filled with Army and National Guard soldiers landing at Selfridge Air Force Base.

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After war

Monday, April 22, 2013

Zouheir Al Ghreiwati looks toward the future of Syria

Zouheir Al Ghreiwati's (BA '14) native land is a warzone.

Hailing from Damascus, Syria, Al Ghreiwati lived in the now war-torn nation until his junior year of high school. Despite the mainstream media's portrayal of Syria as a country divided by sectarian lines, Ghreiwati believes the civil war is driven not by religious hatred, but by the Syrian people's desire for democracy.

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Graduation Open House

Friday, April 12, 2013

Join us on Friday, May 3 at 3 p.m. for the Ford School's annual Open House. All students, families, and friends are welcome. Live music, food, Spirit Store, photo booth, and giveaways.

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U-M moves up on Peace Corps' annual top colleges rankings

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

For the thirteenth year in a row, the University of Michigan has earned a spot on the Peace Corps' annual list of the top volunteer-producing large universities across the country.

With 93 graduates currently serving as Peace Corps volunteers, the university moves to No. 4, up a spot from last year, and remains a solid source of alumni committed to making a difference at home and abroad.

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Fall edition of State & Hill examines global and human security, Bob Axelrod's research on cooperation, the irrepressible First Lady Betty Ford, more

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

In this issue of the Ford School's magazine, State & Hill, readers will learn about global and human security through the eyes of the Ford School: faculty studying the 1994 Rwandan genocide, small arms, terrorist networks, and survivors of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia; students interning for Innovations in Poverty Action; and alums working for USAID. Click through the magazine below to read businessman, philanthropist, and Ford School friend Hank Meijer's discussion of the forthcoming Detroit Meijer store; a story on iconic First Lady Betty Ford and the U-M's fall tribute to her legacy; and how a BA alum who works for the Dept. of Justice is ensuring prisoner's rights.

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The ongoing Eurozone experiment

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

The fortunes of the European Economic and Monetary Union.

For many of us, the year 2006 was part of a different time. Our retirement accounts were increasing in value. Our house values were going up, up, up. Without much difficulty, we could borrow money to buy houses, make home improvements, or buy cars, boats, and refrigerators. Our spending was keeping the economy humming. For lots of us, the financial future looked bright.

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Changing the game: Bob Axelrod's powerful blueprint for peace

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

We've all heard the dictum, an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth. It's an ancient Mesopotamian legal tradition recorded in Hammurabi's Code and in the holy texts of many religious faiths. The concept is simple: repay insult in kind—wound for wound, stripe for stripe, even life for life.

We've also heard the counterargument—an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind. But the two are far from mutually exclusive explains Robert Axelrod in his highly acclaimed book, The Evolution of Cooperation, which outlines a powerfully effective recipe for deescalating conflict.

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Memory and justice: Assembling archives of mass atrocities

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

A woman in Cambodia recently released more than 1,000 photographs of people imprisoned by the Khmer Rouge—the genocidal Democratic Kampuchea regime that ruled the country from 1975–79. She had worked in the regime's prison system and, fearing reprisal for her involvement, had hidden the photos. She gave the photos to the Documentation Center of Cambodia (DC-CAM), but for nearly thirty years, family members didn't know what had happened to their loved ones.

Now they know.

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Mapping terror: Understanding terrorist networks and alliances

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

People collaborate—it's what we do. We work together to tackle big problems. We work together to achieve big goals. We give favors, in hopes that they'll be reciprocated. We look out for each other, in hopes that someone else will look out for us in our moment of need. These collaborations make us stronger, smarter, safer, and more successful.

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Something worth fighting for: The future of an arms trade treaty

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

In July 2012, an eleventh hour phone call with instructions from the White House abruptly stalled passage of an all-but-complete 193-nation Arms Trade Treaty at the United Nations. Susan Waltz, professor of public policy, believes that was a mistake.

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Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA)

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

International development interns put ideas to work

One block down Hill Street, just west of State, is Ali Baba's, a small Middle Eastern restaurant with habit-forming grape leaves and baklava. Any day of the week, you're sure to find a table, or two, or five filled with folks from the Ford School. On just such a visit, I met Dionisio Garcia Piriz (MPP/MA '13), a dual degree master's student who had recently returned from a mind-bending summer internship exploring savings habits among indigenous Tsimané (chee-MAH-nay) tribes in the lowland forests of the Bolivian Amazon. Because most Tsimané rely on barter, the question of how they save for the future—how they build a cushion to support themselves if the plantains, rice, and sweet manioc crops fail—is an intriguing one. And Piriz's Tsimané study wasn't a one-off; it was part of a much larger study of non-traditional savings practices among tribes all over the developing world.

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A conversation with businessman, philanthropist, and Ford School friend, Hank Meijer

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Detroiters spend an estimated $4.6 billion each year on groceries and other merchandise. And more than $1.5 billion of those retail dollars are spent outside of the city.

That's about to change: in May 2012 Michigan-based retailer Meijer broke ground on the first of two planned locations. The first location will anchor the forthcoming Gateway Marketplace on the city's west side with a supercenter—a combination grocery and department store format employed by other retailers but originated by Meijer in 1962.

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Irrepressible First Lady Betty Ford

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Being ladylike does not require silence

There are photos and movies of Betty Ford in her family home from the 1960s. They show a caring homemaker and mother, busy looking after her husband and four young children in their suburban Virginia home. In these images, she looks every inch the typical midcentury middle-class housewife.

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Having an impact now

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

When Jeff Kessner (MPP/MUP '14) joined the Nonprofit and Public Management Center (NPM) last year, he knew he would learn a lot about how nonprofits work. But he didn't know that he would soon be on the board of one.

"I was a Board Fellow last year, and this year they asked me to join the board as a full voting member. So I am actually on the board now as a member and as a peer mentor for the five new Board Fellows."

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BA alum works to ensure prisoners' civil rights

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

For Gary Graca (BA '09), a degree in public policy was about seeing what happens out of public view. As a paralegal in the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Graca visits the inner workings of state-funded prisons and mental health facilities to ensure compliance with civil rights laws. Much of Graca's work is based on Olmstead v. L.C., a 1999 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that prohibits states from institutionalizing people with disabilities if they could be accommodated in community care settings. Failure to follow the Court's "integration mandate" would be a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

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