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Inaugural Dow Sustainability Fellow Cassie Brown helps city establish revolving loan fund for A2 energy efficiency upgrades

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

The first cohort of Dow Sustainability Fellows has recently partnered with the City of Ann Arbor on a pilot project establishing a new, low-interest revolving loan fund for landlords and renters seeking to improve the energy efficiency of rental properties. Cassie Brown, who is seeking a dual degree in engineering and public policy and a Science, Technology, and Public Policy certificate, is among the Dow Sustainability Fellows engaged in the project. Others include Alicia Chin and Amy Eischen from the Ross School of Business, Efrie Friedlander from the Taubman College of Art and Architecture, and Emily Taylor, who is affiliated with the Erb Institute, the School of Natural Resources, and the Ross School of Business.

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Maya Menlo plays a role in U-M decision to support Bangladesh factory safety accord

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

"President Mary Sue Coleman announced April 1 that U-M will adopt the recommendations of the President's Advisory Committee on Labor Standards and Human Rights that all U-M licensees either sign and abide by a worker safety initiative called the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh or demonstrate that they have an equivalent safety plan," reports Kim Broekhuizen in the April 7 edition of The University Record.

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Alumni Board Members Elected to Serve January 1, 2014-December 31, 2016

Friday, December 20, 2013

This past fall, Ford School alumni elected six of their peers to serve on the Alumni Board. Those elected to serve from January 1, 2014 through December 31, 2016 are Peter Fritz (MPP/MBA '10), Keith Fudge (MPP '09), Tres Fuller (BA '10), Catherine Lomax (MPP '01), Jomo Thorne (MPP/MBA '08), and Paul Weech (MPP '81).

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BA alum among 'Top 35 under 35' foreigners making an impact in Africa

Monday, December 16, 2013

Madelynne Wager (BA '13), a first generation college student from the small town of Greenville, Mich., knew she wanted to make an impact. When she started her studies at the University of Michigan, she thought she could do that best by becoming a doctor. But during a summer medical internship in Venezuela, Wager became deeply troubled by the health disparities she witnessed between the wealthy patients at the region's spotless, upscale hospital, and what the poor confronted at the area's crowded, unkempt clinic. Why are poor people getting so much sicker in the first place, she wondered, and if poverty makes you vulnerable, can a living wage improve your health?

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Rare and powerful analysis

Monday, December 16, 2013

Latesha Love (MPP '02) was two weeks into her second year of graduate school in Ann Arbor, getting dressed for class and watching the news with an absent-minded interest, when she realized that "something was really, really, really wrong." It was the morning of September 11, and Love, like everyone else in America, quickly became riveted by the events unfolding on her television.

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Matching and mobilizing private investments in conservation

Monday, December 16, 2013

Jason Weller (MPP '99) was just out of college, with a still-crisp undergraduate degree, when the native northern-Californian took an unlikely summer job on a family ranching operation in Big Timber, Montana. He was expecting a "Brad Pitt, Legends of the Fall experience," he recalls with self-deprecating humor; instead, he wound up working harder than he'd ever worked in his life. He fixed the fences, shoveled the manure, stacked the hay, and dodged the bulls and rattlesnakes; but his most important responsibility was irrigation.

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From dreaming to doing - tuition equality now

Monday, December 16, 2013

On April 17, 2013, at approximately 6:00 p.m., 50-60 people gathered outside the Michigan Union, at the intersection of State Street and South University. U-M student activists and Ann Arbor community members had come to protest the University's in-state tuition policy, which at that time excluded undocumented Michigan high school graduates. By 7:00 p.m., the protesters had blocked the intersection. "What do we want?" they chanted, in a classic protest call and response. "Tuition equality! When do we want it? Now!" Eight were arrested, including Ford School alumna Marisol Ramos (MPP/MA '13) who, despite her youth, has been an immigrant rights activist and organizer for nearly a decade.

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Yes, you! - The unlikely and absolutely inspiring career of Eunice Burns

Monday, December 16, 2013

Eunice Burns (MPA '70) holds up a photograph taken at her 90th birthday celebration. It's of her children—Catherine's the oldest; then there's Laurie, Robert, and Tamara. In the picture Burns beams with pride, as she does now. Over the years, Burns' children have organized small tributes on her birthday to honor her lifetime of dedication to the city of Ann Arbor; on a number of occasions she has received proclamations from the mayor.

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Cast your vote for the 2013 Ford School Alumni Board

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Voting for the six open seats on the Ford School Alumni Board open through November 19, 2013.

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Ford School launches alumni-in-residence program

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Graduate Career Services and Alumni Relations have launched an alumni-in-residence program where graduates spend a half-day at the Ford School providing professional development support for students through resume reviews, mock interviews, career conversations, and/or office hours.

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Self-nominations now being accepted for Ford School Alumni Board

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Ford School Alumni Board members Elle Beard (BA '09), Kate Brady-Medley (MPP '01), and Daniela Pineda (PhD '10) issued a call for self-nominations for six open board seats. The Alumni Board supports the activities of the Ford School through alumni networking, career services, student recruitment, and fundraising activities. Self-nomination forms will be accepted for the five graduate program alumni seats and the one undergraduate program alumnus seat through October 23, 2013 at 5 p.m. EST.

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The power of philanthropy to transform Arkansas communities

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

"I want change now," says Sherece West-Scantlebury (MPP '89). "I want the solutions now to solve old and difficult problems that keep Arkansas in the bottom five on indicators of children and family well-being. I want us to be number one on those indicators today." The Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation (WRF) in Little Rock does the kind of philanthropic giving that can help Arkansas' many nonprofit organizations make that goal a reality. West-Scantlebury, WRF's president and CEO, is happy to pilot the ship.

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Ford School alumna recognized for outstanding performance by a public sector employee in New Orleans

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Jennifer Cecil (MPP '09) received a Merit Award at the Bureau of Governmental Research's Excellence in Government Awards in on September 24 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Establish in 1994, the annual program recognizes government employees for outstanding performance and creative problem-solving.

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Recent BA graduate named one of the "Top 35 under 35" foreigners working in Africa

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Madelynne Wager (BA '13) was selected as one of top young foreigners making an impact on the continent of Africa by Young People in International Affairs (YPIA). With this year's list, YPIA is honoring people who provide a counter narrative to the established and expected story of social migration out of Africa towards the West.

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Alumnus Alan Cohen selected by the president for key administration post

Monday, September 30, 2013

President Obama announced his intent to nominate Alan Cohen (MPP '75) as a member of the Social Security Advisory Board.

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Cross-sector partnerships fuel new breakthroughs in affordable housing

Monday, September 30, 2013

"It's Maslow's hierarchy of needs," Paul Weech (MPP '81) says. "Cover the basics—food and shelter—and you allow people to focus their time and energy on work, family, education, and all the rest."

A self-proclaimed "houser," Weech is fervent about the need for affordable housing in the United States, and has dedicated much of his professional career to the cause, including ten years with Fannie Mae and four with the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. For the past four years, Weech has continued that work as executive vice president of policy and member engagement for the Housing Partnership Network, a Boston-based network of the nation's 100 largest and most active nonprofits in affordable housing and community development.

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Recent BA graduate begins research in Kenya as inaugural Wallenberg Fellow

Sunday, September 22, 2013

Zachary Petroni (BA '13) is one month into his study of the relationship between conservation governance and human rights in Kenya. Petroni was interviewed by the Michigan Daily about his experience so far and his overall objectives.

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Building on success

Monday, September 16, 2013

Here's something you might not know: more than 90 percent of American children have health insurance. While making sure that all U.S. children have coverage is the goal, this is definitely a win. And according to Elisabeth Wright Burak (MPP/MSW '01), senior program director for Georgetown University's Center for Children and Families (CCF), we can attribute this success story to Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. "A lot of it has to do with work that has happened at the state level," says Burak, "making it easier for families to sign up for healthcare coverage, taking a lot of red tape out of the system, and modernizing eligibility systems so kids don't drop off unnecessarily. Now we're in this exciting new era of health reform where states have the opportunity to make the same progress for parents and other adults who have no affordable coverage today—the whole family wins."

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Close to the heart

Monday, August 19, 2013

The statistics are sobering: nearly half of every 100 children born in Uttar Pradesh, the most populous state in India, will be underweight; six will die before their first birthday. More than 80 percent of all children report repeated physical abuse; some 44 percent of girls and 56 percent of boys report sexual abuse. Child labor is common and, for girls, so is marrying—and bearing children—while still in adolescence.

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Thinking and doing

Saturday, August 10, 2013

Zenia Lewis (MPP '09) is just back from a whirlwind trip to Uganda and Ethiopia, but she doesn't sound the least bit jetlagged. In fact, her manner is lively and engaged—two attributes that must serve her well as a research analyst on the Africa Growth Initiative for Brookings Institution. The job isn't all about conducting research, crunching numbers, and writing reports, although there is a lot of that.

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