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CNBC Asia interviewed Susan M. Collins during a trip to Hong Kong

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Susan M. Collins, dean of the Ford School of Public Policy, discusses the European financial crisis and the Chinese economy on Tuesday, May 29 as a guest on CNBC's popular financial news show "Squawk Box" in Hong Kong.

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Danziger: U.S. is exceptional in its tolerance of poverty

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

A new report by UNICEF found the United States had the second-highest rate of relative child poverty among 35 of the world's richest countries. Relative child poverty, which critics say may not necessarily reflect real hardship, refers to children living in households where disposable income is less than half of the national median income.

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Atran book includes interviews with jihadist leaders

Monday, May 28, 2012

Scott Atran has interviewed dozens of terrorist leaders and operatives, and he has collected his insights from those conversations in his book, "Talking to the Enemy: Faith, Brotherhood, and the (Un)Making of Terrorists." He discussed those insights on the National Public Radio program, "To the Best of Our Knowledge."

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Parthasarathy: Geoengineering patents could follow the U.S. atomic energy model

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Shobita Parthasarathy told Nature magazine that the geoengineering field "urgently needs" to define intellectual property rights for technologies that could have far-reaching consequences for the planet.

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NPC study: Even among low-income families with children, the gap is widening

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

"Off the Charts," a blog written by policy analysts and researchers at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, featured two recent studies by the Ford School-based National Poverty Center.

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Colleague Scott Atran cites Axelrod's work on symbolic gestures in Middle East conflicts

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Robert Axelrod was cited in an op-ed for Science and Religion Today titled, "How Can a Better Understanding of Sacred Values Help Us Resolve Intergroup Conflicts?" The op-ed was written by Scott Atran, a research scientist at the University's Research Center for Group Dynamics and a frequent collaborator of Axelrod's.

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Wightman: Even higher-income families are reducing financial support for college-age children

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

A National Poverty Center study led by postdoctoral fellow Patrick Wightman found that 62 percent of children ages 19 to 22 receive some financial assistance from their parents. A recent article by Reuters examined the reasons the remaining 38 percent did not receive any.

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James S. House receives University of Michigan 2013 Henry Russel Lectureship

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

James S. House has been selected to receive the University of Michigan's 2013 Henry Russel Lectureship.

The Lectureship, which was established in 1926, is the highest honor the University bestows on a senior member of its faculty. While the award primarily recognizes exceptional scholarship, those chosen to hold the Lectureship are also expected to be outstanding citizens of the University with exemplary records of teaching, mentoring, and service.

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Schwarz: Residence, fundraising and age all factors against run at old U.S. House seat

Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Ford School lecturer and former U.S. Representative Joe Schwarz has decided not to challenge incumbent U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg in the 2012 election, Mlive.com reported last week.

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"NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams" broadcast includes NPC research

Friday, May 4, 2012

A new study by the Ford School-based National Poverty Center on the financial assistance college-age adults receive from their baby-boomer parents swept across the national airwaves Thursday, receiving mention on "NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams" and Fox News Radio.

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Dynarski: Complexity of paying for college discourages potential students

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The Wall Street Journal quoted Susan M. Dynarski in a recent article about the barriers to education attainment in the U.S. and how that will impact the U.S. economy in the long term. According to the article, the current generation of Americans will accrue less formal education than their parents, breaking a longstanding trend.

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Battle of the Super PACs: Campaign financing impacts American electoral politics

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Much of America is mesmerized by the recent and remarkable torrent of money flowing into the 2012 elections by organizations with buoyant names like Restore Our Future and Make Us Great Again. These contributions have dramatically overshadowed expenditures by the candidates and political parties that have traditionally run campaigns. It wasn't always so, explains Ford School Professor Richard L. Hall, who has written extensively on the influence of money in politics and policy.

Prior to the rise of Super PACs, Political Action Committees (PACs) "could contribute such small sums of money to candidates that it was hard to imagine these contributions had much of an impact at all," says Hall. "The better hypothesis was not that PAC contributions were buying something from members, but that they were signaling something to them."

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Down to earth: Marina Whitman talks life and work in "The Martian's Daughter."

Thursday, April 26, 2012

In The Martian's Daughter: A Memoir, economist Marina Whitman talks candidly about her life, her work, and stepping outside of her famous father's shadow

In the fall of 1970, Marina von Neumann Whitman, unnerved by a tight deadline, burst into the office of Paul McCracken, then chairman of the president's Council of Economic Advisers (CEA). McCracken had invited the rising young economist to join his staff for a year—in a position that would set the stage for a series of increasingly prominent government appointments. Faced with a routine finance report and a conflicting personal obligation (her brother's wedding), Whitman sought reassurance from her mentor that she was up to the job—an unfounded insecurity that belied her professional achievement.

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Chamberlin: "It's everybody's job to keep city hall paying attention"

Monday, April 23, 2012

The city manager of Alexandria, Va., has instituted a new ethics initiative following a series of criminal charges against city workers in 2011, The Alexandria Times reported Monday. The eight incidents, which included charges of forgery, embezzlement, and drunk driving, led city manager Rashad Young to create an ethics committee of city employees, a whistleblower hotline, and mandatory training and retraining, among other reforms.

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Danziger supports study's formula for gauging "the 1 percent"

Monday, April 23, 2012

Sheldon Danziger, director of the National Poverty Center and professor of public policy, was cited in a New York Times op-ed addressing the use of research in framing the public debate over income inequality in America.

A new study by economists Emmanuel Saez of the University of California, Berkeley and Thomas Piketty of the School of Economics in Paris looked at individuals' "market income"—total pre-tax income, not including any transfer payments from government, like unemployment or Social Security—to track the concentration of the nation's wealth.

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AAAS selects five faculty members as fellows, including Elisabeth Gerber

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Five U-M faculty members have been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a prestigious society that recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions in scholarly and professional fields.

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Dynarski study finds women more likely to attend college than men

Saturday, April 14, 2012

Bloomberg News referenced a study co-authored by Susan M. Dynarski in an article that examines why more men have not pursued college degrees to boost their employment prospects.

Dynarski, an associate professor at the Ford School and School of Education, co-authored the December 2011 study, "Gains and Gaps: Changing Inequality in the U.S. College Entry and Completion," with Martha J. Bailey, an assistant professor in the Department of Economics and research affiliate at the National Poverty Center.

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Chamberlin: "I don't think ethics is the problem"

Thursday, April 12, 2012

The Center for Public Integrity (CPI) ranked Michigan's state ethics laws 43rd in a recent nationwide study. But John Chamberlin, professor of political science and public policy at the Ford School, did not sound too distressed in an interview with Bridge Magazine about Michigan's "F" grade.

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Dynarski study finds women more likely to attend college than men

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Bloomberg News referenced a study co-authored by Susan M. Dynarski in an article that examines why more men have not pursued college degrees to boost their employment prospects.

Dynarski, an associate professor at the Ford School and School of Education, co-authored the December 2011 study, "Gains and Gaps: Changing Inequality in the U.S. College Entry and Completion," with Martha J. Bailey, an assistant professor in the Department of Economics and research affiliate at the National Poverty Center.

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Allan C. Stam to join Ford School faculty, direct International Policy Center

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

The Ford School is pleased to announce that the very distinguished Allan C. Stam has accepted its offer to join the faculty. Al is a professor of political science here at the U-M, and will move 50% of his appointment to the Ford School starting in fall 2012.

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