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Phil Potter awarded grant by DoD's Minerva Research Initiative

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

The Minerva Research Initiative, a Department of Defense-sponsored, university-based social science research initiative, has awarded funding for a research project led by Ford School assistant professor Philip B. K. Potter.

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Sarah Pendergast (BA '10) to attend United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Sarah Pendergast (BA '10) has been selected as one of 25 youth delegates to participate in the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, a conference to be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from June 20-22. The conference will readdress issues and commitments brought up at the 1992 Earth Summit in the same city. Pendergast will attend as an "Agent of Change" through SustainUS, an environmental justice non-profit run entirely by youth and volunteers.

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Robert M. Stern co-edits Oxford Handbook on the World Trade Organization for Oxford University Press

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Robert M. Stern was one of a team of three editors of the recently published Oxford Handbook on the World Trade Organization. According to the publisher, the book that aims to provide "an authoritative and cutting-edge account of the World Trade Organization." Stern edited the book alongside Amrita Narlikar, the director of the Centre for Rising Powers at Cambridge University, and Martin Daunton, a professor of history at Cambridge University.

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David Harding to receive ASA's Outstanding Book Award

Friday, June 8, 2012

The American Sociological Association's (ASA) Section on Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility has named David Harding the recipient of its 2012 Outstanding Book Award. Harding will be presented the award at the 2012 ASA annual meeting, which will be held in Denver, CO in August.

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Horwitz, Levy: Argument against the Affordable Care Act based on shaky premise

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Jonathan Cohn, a senior editor at The New Republic, featured a blog post by Jill R. Horwitz and Helen Levy in his column, "Will Bogus Policy Arguments Swing the Supreme Court?"

Cohn challenges the veracity of an amicus brief filed by a conservative advocacy group that opposes the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which President Obama signed into law in 2010. The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments on the law's constitutionality in March, particularly the health insurance mandate. The brief argues that mandating health insurance would set a precedent requiring citizens to make other compulsory purchases.

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Brick by brick: building momentum in New Orleans

Friday, June 1, 2012

New Orleans knows about starting over. When the storm surge from Hurricane Katrina breached the city's levees and floodwalls, the subsequent floods killed more than 1,500 people in New Orleans and throughout Louisiana. This one-two punch of catastrophe also left more than 100,000 more displaced—many of whom have never returned. As a result, New Orleans is both a very old place and a very new one. Some of its problems, entrenched government bureaucracy among them, predate Katrina but have nevertheless made building post-hurricane momentum difficult.

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Research project led by Dean Yang receives USAID grant

Friday, June 1, 2012

Development Innovation Ventures, a competitive grant program by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), has awarded a grant to a group of researchers led by Dean Yang.

Yang's project, "Honing help back home: Maximizing the development impact of migrant remittances," will examine whether migrants would be more generous in remitting their earnings if they could be sure of how the money would be used. Remittances that migrants send home are the
second largest cash inflow to developing countries.

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NSAPOCC: Americans are skeptical of geoengineering solutions to climate change

Thursday, May 31, 2012

The latest version of the National Survey of American Public Opinion on Climate Change (NSAPOCC), co-authored by Barry Rabe, has been published in the May 2012 edition of "Issues in Governance Studies" by The Brookings Institution.

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CNBC Asia interviewed Susan M. Collins during a trip to Hong Kong

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Susan M. Collins, dean of the Ford School of Public Policy, discusses the European financial crisis and the Chinese economy on Tuesday, May 29 as a guest on CNBC's popular financial news show "Squawk Box" in Hong Kong.

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Danziger: U.S. is exceptional in its tolerance of poverty

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

A new report by UNICEF found the United States had the second-highest rate of relative child poverty among 35 of the world's richest countries. Relative child poverty, which critics say may not necessarily reflect real hardship, refers to children living in households where disposable income is less than half of the national median income.

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Atran book includes interviews with jihadist leaders

Monday, May 28, 2012

Scott Atran has interviewed dozens of terrorist leaders and operatives, and he has collected his insights from those conversations in his book, "Talking to the Enemy: Faith, Brotherhood, and the (Un)Making of Terrorists." He discussed those insights on the National Public Radio program, "To the Best of Our Knowledge."

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Parthasarathy: Geoengineering patents could follow the U.S. atomic energy model

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Shobita Parthasarathy told Nature magazine that the geoengineering field "urgently needs" to define intellectual property rights for technologies that could have far-reaching consequences for the planet.

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NPC study: Even among low-income families with children, the gap is widening

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

"Off the Charts," a blog written by policy analysts and researchers at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, featured two recent studies by the Ford School-based National Poverty Center.

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Colleague Scott Atran cites Axelrod's work on symbolic gestures in Middle East conflicts

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Robert Axelrod was cited in an op-ed for Science and Religion Today titled, "How Can a Better Understanding of Sacred Values Help Us Resolve Intergroup Conflicts?" The op-ed was written by Scott Atran, a research scientist at the University's Research Center for Group Dynamics and a frequent collaborator of Axelrod's.

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Wightman: Even higher-income families are reducing financial support for college-age children

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

A National Poverty Center study led by postdoctoral fellow Patrick Wightman found that 62 percent of children ages 19 to 22 receive some financial assistance from their parents. A recent article by Reuters examined the reasons the remaining 38 percent did not receive any.

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James S. House receives University of Michigan 2013 Henry Russel Lectureship

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

James S. House has been selected to receive the University of Michigan's 2013 Henry Russel Lectureship.

The Lectureship, which was established in 1926, is the highest honor the University bestows on a senior member of its faculty. While the award primarily recognizes exceptional scholarship, those chosen to hold the Lectureship are also expected to be outstanding citizens of the University with exemplary records of teaching, mentoring, and service.

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Schwarz: Residence, fundraising and age all factors against run at old U.S. House seat

Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Ford School lecturer and former U.S. Representative Joe Schwarz has decided not to challenge incumbent U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg in the 2012 election, Mlive.com reported last week.

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"NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams" broadcast includes NPC research

Friday, May 4, 2012

A new study by the Ford School-based National Poverty Center on the financial assistance college-age adults receive from their baby-boomer parents swept across the national airwaves Thursday, receiving mention on "NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams" and Fox News Radio.

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Dynarski: Complexity of paying for college discourages potential students

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The Wall Street Journal quoted Susan M. Dynarski in a recent article about the barriers to education attainment in the U.S. and how that will impact the U.S. economy in the long term. According to the article, the current generation of Americans will accrue less formal education than their parents, breaking a longstanding trend.

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Battle of the Super PACs: Campaign financing impacts American electoral politics

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Much of America is mesmerized by the recent and remarkable torrent of money flowing into the 2012 elections by organizations with buoyant names like Restore Our Future and Make Us Great Again. These contributions have dramatically overshadowed expenditures by the candidates and political parties that have traditionally run campaigns. It wasn't always so, explains Ford School Professor Richard L. Hall, who has written extensively on the influence of money in politics and policy.

Prior to the rise of Super PACs, Political Action Committees (PACs) "could contribute such small sums of money to candidates that it was hard to imagine these contributions had much of an impact at all," says Hall. "The better hypothesis was not that PAC contributions were buying something from members, but that they were signaling something to them."

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