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Inaugural Dow Sustainability Fellow Cassie Brown helps city establish revolving loan fund for A2 energy efficiency upgrades

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

The first cohort of Dow Sustainability Fellows has recently partnered with the City of Ann Arbor on a pilot project establishing a new, low-interest revolving loan fund for landlords and renters seeking to improve the energy efficiency of rental properties. Cassie Brown, who is seeking a dual degree in engineering and public policy and a Science, Technology, and Public Policy certificate, is among the Dow Sustainability Fellows engaged in the project. Others include Alicia Chin and Amy Eischen from the Ross School of Business, Efrie Friedlander from the Taubman College of Art and Architecture, and Emily Taylor, who is affiliated with the Erb Institute, the School of Natural Resources, and the Ross School of Business.

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CLOSUP illuminates local leaders' perceptions of tax-exempt properties

Thursday, April 10, 2014

"It's no overstatement to say that property tax revenues are really the lifeblood of local government. So what do local leaders think about the tax-exempt properties within their borders—the ones that take up municipal services, but are exempt from paying taxes?" asks Cynthia Canty of "Stateside," the Michigan Radio program, during a recent interview with Tom Ivacko (MPA '93), administrator and program manager of CLOSUP.

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Khmer Rouge Trials: Serving to End or Compound Cambodia's Culture of Impunity?

Thursday, April 10, 2014

In a conversation moderated by Susan Waltz, Margo Picken and John Ciorciari will discuss the positive and negative effects of the UN-backed Khmer Rouge trials that began several years ago in "extraordinary chambers" of the courts of Cambodia. Will they bring "closure" to the country's dark past? What impact have they had on the situation of human rights in Cambodia today?

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Waltz argues Universal Declaration of Human Rights a global, cooperative effort; not just a western idea

Thursday, April 10, 2014

On April 9th, Professor of Public Policy Susan E. Waltz, a scholar and long-time leader in the field of human rights, describes "How Human Rights Went Global" in openSecurity. Waltz says the Universal Declaration of Human Rights isn't a document of western values imposed on the world, an argument used by many human rights abusers to discard the letter and intent of the Declaration. Rather, it "emerged from the wisdom of the post-war international crowd," a true reflection of international beliefs codified in international law.

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Ford School mourns Margaret Ann (Ranny) Riecker (HLLD '05)

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Margaret Ann (Ranny) Riecker (HLLD '05), who passed away in Midland, Mich., on April 7, was among the Ford School's most generous volunteers and supporters. Her philanthropy through the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation (where she was president), the Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Foundation (where she was chair), and personal giving with her late husband John Riecker (AB '52, JD '54), has been instrumental in the Ford School's advancement over the years.

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Public less supportive of state fossil fuel taxes, says CLOSUP, still strong for renewable electricity

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

CLOSUP's March report from the National Surveys on Energy and the Environment reveals declining support for state fossil fuel taxes levied to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

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Students and staff run Big House 5K for fun and charity

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Ford School students and staff ran in the second annual Big House 5K: Trail to the Victors on Sunday, April 6. The event, coordinated by the U-M Athletic Department and Ann Arbor Track Club, began at the Glick Field House, circled through campus, and ended on the 50-yard-line of the Big House.

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Maya Menlo plays a role in U-M decision to support Bangladesh factory safety accord

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

"President Mary Sue Coleman announced April 1 that U-M will adopt the recommendations of the President's Advisory Committee on Labor Standards and Human Rights that all U-M licensees either sign and abide by a worker safety initiative called the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh or demonstrate that they have an equivalent safety plan," reports Kim Broekhuizen in the April 7 edition of The University Record.

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Harvard Political Review article quotes Mary Corcoran on gender inequality in the academy

Friday, April 4, 2014

In the Harvard Political Review article, "Leaks in the Pipeline: Gender Equity in the Academy," Kaitlyn Jeong quotes Professor Mary Corcoran on gender inequality in academia.

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Debate over 'Pay It Forward' continues, Dynarski's suggested amendments receive increased attention

Friday, April 4, 2014

Susan Dynarski is quoted in a number of articles this month discussing 'Pay It Forward' legislation, now under consideration by more than a dozen states, which would tie student loan repayments to a percentage of income for a fixed number of years. The model, explains Dynarski in her February Brookings blog, is a disincentive to those who expect to make a higher income post-graduation. Why? Because they'll wind up paying more and subsidizing low earners.

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Times of India highlights Yang study, motivating migrants boosts savings

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Ruchi Chopda of the Times of India reports on a recent discovery by Dean Yang and Ganesh Seshan: motivating migrants can help them save more, do it more collaboratively, and send more money to their families back home.

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Inequality in America

Thursday, April 3, 2014

This talk will investigate the problem of rising economic inequality in the United States and the various options for addressing it. The unique history of the U.S. has meant that the U.S. political discussion has historically been unconcerned with income inequality; however, rising inequality during the past three decades is attracting increased attention and concern. Growing economic inequality is also closely correlated with rising inequality in a variety of other social domains. This includes evidence of growing differences by economic status in education, housing, health, and marital/fertility choices. Many of the major causes of this rising inequality are not easily addressed in any direct way. In fact, some of these causes have produced other substantial benefits. Within the political economy of the U.S., there are only a limited number of areas where inequality can be addressed in ways that might garner widespread support, including efforts aimed at greater opportunity for low-income families in educat

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The aftermath of financial crises: It doesn't have to be that bad

Thursday, April 3, 2014

In the wake of the 2008 crisis, many have concluded that financial crises inevitably lead to prolonged, terrible recessions. But in fact, there have been a wide range of experiences throughout history. How much countries suffer depends crucially on the policies governments adopt. This examination of history has implications for what Europe and other areas should do today, and for what policies should be used in future crises.

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Metropolitan areas, regionalism, and the politics of intergovernmental cooperation

Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Ford School's distinguished Jack L. Walker, Jr. Professor of Public Policy Elisabeth R. Gerber will deliver a lecture as part of our school's centennial celebrations.

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GM penny-wise and pound-foolish says Marina v.N. Whitman

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

In an interview with reporters, Marina v.N. Whitman, once the highest ranking female executive in the auto industry and a former vice president and group executive at General Motors, discusses the company's lengthy delay in recalling cars with faulty ignition switches that have been blamed for at least 13 deaths.

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Armed with Expertise: The Militarization of American Social Research during the Cold War

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Joy Rohde will remark on major points of her book Armed with Expertise and answer questions from the audience. The event includes remarks from Alan Deardorff and Gabrielle Hecht.

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Public policy students respond to Kevyn Orr's Ford School lecture

Friday, March 28, 2014

On March 26, 2014, Detroit's Emergency Manager, Kevyn Orr, spoke at the University of Michigan as part of an event put on by the Center for Local, State and Urban Policy and the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. Public policy student Harsha Nahata was quoted in Rochelle Riley's Detroit Free Press column on her thoughts about Orr's speech and about the future of the city of Detroit.

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Ford School survey informs leaders on fiscal health and economic development

Friday, March 28, 2014

Five years ago, the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy launched an ongoing survey of the chief elected and appointed officials in every one of Michigan's 1,856 counties, cities, townships and villages, large and small. Among the survey's goals? Identifying their most pressing governance problems, including the impact of cuts in state revenue-sharing, tax-revenue losses, and troublesome barriers to economic development, as well as the innovative steps local leaders are taking to effectively overcome them.

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20 years after the Rwandan Genocide - with Paul Rusesabagina

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

This Keynote lecture is part of the IPC commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide. Rwandan Event Registration.

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Kevyn Orr speaks at the Ford School

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Over 400 people turned out on March 25th to hear Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr deliver a lecture as part of the Policy Talks @ the Ford School series.

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