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Ford School mourns the loss of Kenneth Furlough

Friday, June 20, 2014

Kenneth Furlough, who began his MPP studies at the Ford School in the fall of 2013, passed away early last week from hypertensive heart disease. Kenneth was a warm, kind, gregarious person, with a lasting commitment to public policy. The Ford School community is deeply saddened by the news of his death.

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NY Times publishes "answer on a postcard"

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Senators Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn) and Michael Bennet (D-Colo) have proposed a bipartisan bill to dramatically simplify the college financial aid form. They announced their proposal in the op-ed column, "An Answer on a Postcard," published by The New York Times on June 18, which heavily cites Susan Dynarski's research and policy recommendations. Dynarski first introduced the concept in a policy proposal published in 2007.

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"No legitimate, fact-based reason" to deny gay marriage

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

On June 17, both MLive and the Detroit Free Press reported on amicus briefs filed with the 6th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals (covering appeals from Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee) in Michigan's landmark gay marriage case.

Amicus briefs were filed by more than 50 corporations, 16 states, and a group of 25 Republicans. Among the Republicans to stand in favor of gay marriage is Dr. John J.H. (Joe) Schwarz, a long-time lecturer at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy.

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The Guardian features Courant study: Top U's pay too much

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

"Top universities are paying too much for scores of academic journals provided by major publishing companies," writes Ian Sample, science editor of The Guardian, in the June 16 article, "Universities 'get poor value' from academic journal-publishing firms." Sample is citing the work of Paul Courant and colleagues, "Evaluating big deal journal bundles," published June 16 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Obama EO on student loan relief doesn't go far enough

Monday, June 16, 2014

In her Economic View "Finding Shock Absorbers for Student Debt," published June 15 in the Sunday business section of The New York Times, Susan Dynarski explains why President Obama's recent executive order aimed at easing the debt burden for millions of student loan borrowers doesn't go far enough. Student loan payments should be adjusted automatically, just like Social Security contributions and tax payments, argues Dynarski.

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No job, no welfare, no good

Friday, June 13, 2014

A recent report authored by Kristin Seefeldt and colleagues from The Urban Institute is the subject of Olga Khazan's article for The Atlantic, "What Happens If You Have No Welfare and No Job?"

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Student loan market regulation, the urgency of reform

Friday, June 13, 2014

"Remember the Problems with Mortgage Defaults? They're Coming Back with Student Loans," writes Professor Susan Dynarski in The Upshot, The New York Times' curated blog on politics, policy, and economics. "The parallels with the mortgage crisis are striking," writes Dynarski, who goes on to describe the delays distressed borrowers encounter, and the policies and practices that create and exacerbate them.

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Dr. Schwarz speaks with Stateside on care of veterans

Friday, June 13, 2014

Cynthia Canty of Stateside, a Michigan Radio program, interviewed Dr. John J.H. "Joe" Schwarz, a physician and former Republican Congressman, about the Veterans Affairs Administration audit that flagged three Michigan VA medical care facilities—in Ann Arbor, Lansing, and Muskegon—for a close review of practices.

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The Atlantic cites Jacob's teacher tenure study

Thursday, June 12, 2014

As a California judge rules that the state's teacher tenure system is disproportionately harmful to children from low-income families, Dana Goldstein explores the origins and impacts of the state's teacher tenure system—both positive and negative—in The Atlantic.

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One in three say no solid evidence of global warming

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

By Greta Guest

While a majority of Americans still believe that global warming is occurring, the cold and snowy winter of 2014 created more disbelievers, according to a newly released survey by the National Surveys on Energy and Environment. The survey is a joint effort of the Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy at U-M's Ford School of Public Policy and the Muhlenberg Institute of Public Opinion at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pa.

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Read 'the Ford School feed'

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

The latest edition of the Ford School feed, an email news source for alumni and friends of the school, is now available.

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Money magazine interviews Wolfers on money and happiness

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

In the June 9 Money magazine article, "Does Money Buy Happiness," Susie Poppick interviews Justin Wolfers on the research he and Betsey Stevenson have done to illuminate the complex relationship between money and happiness.

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Better schools, better learning?

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

"Billions of dollars are spent annually to construct new schools, and to repair and upgrade existing ones," says Isaac McFarlin, a research scientist at the Ford School. "In 2008 alone, state and local governments spent more than $66 billion to improve the overall quality of school facilities, and another $400 billion is owed in school improvement and construction bond debt." At a time when one-quarter of U.S. schools report a need for extensive repairs—the majority of these at schools serving low-income and minority students—understanding the effect of facilities improvements on student performance is vital.

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"Ned was right" conference at the Fed

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Over three decades of service, Founding Dean Ned Gramlich helped shape the Ford School's mission and vision, and served as an exemplar of what it means to be a world-class policy professor. He conducted extensive and widely-respected research, both theoretical and applied, and shared his findings broadly in books, scholarly journal articles, policy briefs, and frequent interactions with policy leaders. He served in alternating, and sometimes simultaneous, leadership positions in government and academia, including as a governor of the Federal Reserve Board and acting director of the Congressional Budget Office. And, wherever he went, whatever he did, he demonstrated thoughtfulness, humor, and camaraderie as a teacher, mentor, and colleague.

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Symposium honors Jim House; 35 years of teaching, service

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

After an academic career spanning eight years at Duke University and some 35 years at the University of Michigan, Professor James S. House will retire this August. To celebrate his career, former students and postdocs participated in a day-long symposium at the Michigan League on June 2, sharing their research and emphasizing how their own intellectual agendas and accomplishments had been impacted by Jim's scholarship and mentorship.

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Students explore windy city careers

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

For years, the Ford School has hosted an annual student trip to Washington, DC, where Ford School students can learn more about careers in our nation's capital. This year, we added something new to the mix—a student trip to Chicago.

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Meet our 2014 PPIA Fellows

Monday, June 9, 2014

An anthropology major from Ghana; a liberal arts major from Jamaica; an international studies major from Livonia; a business administration major from Los Angeles; an economics major from West Virginia; a sociology major from Santa Ana; a political science major from Mexico; the list goes on. Altogether, 18 undergraduate students have been selected for the Ford School's Public Policy and International Affairs Junior Summer Institute, an intensive summer training program for aspiring public servants.

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College credit for high school courses?

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

A $2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences (IES) will allow Ford School faculty and colleagues at partner institutions to launch a five-year study on the impact of a new Tennessee policy that allows students to earn college credits for advanced math courses taken in high school.

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Internship field report: Nick Pfost @ EqualityMaine

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Second year MPPer Nick Pfost shares news from Portland, Maine, where he's serving as legislative and public policy graduate intern at EqualityMaine. In his guest blog post for EqualityMaine, Pfost describes himself as "the nerdy high school student who watched CSPAN after classes while eating my macaroni and cheese." He'll spend the summer working on a variety of EqualityMaine legislative priorities, including LGBT-inclusive anti-bullying legislation.

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Rabe cited in Forbes on EPA greenhouse gas rules

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Ford School Professor Barry Rabe was cited in Howard Gleckman's June 2 Forbes article "Could EPA's New Greenhouse Gas Rule Open the Door to a New State-based Gas Tax?" "The proposed EPA rules, which Brookings senior fellow Barry Rabe describes as "climate federalism," seem to acknowledge the demise—at least for now—of a single federal solution to the climate problem," writes Gleckman.

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