Type: Seminar

Medical school salaries at Michigan

Date & Time

Mar 16, 2016, 8:30-10:00 am EDT

Location

Weill Hall, Room 3240
735 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Open to PhD students and faculty engaged in causal inference in education research.

About the speakers:

Paul Courant has served as provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs, University Librarian and Dean of Libraries, as associate provost for Academic and Budgetary Affairs, as chair of the Department of Economics, and as director of the Institute of Public Policy Studies (predecessor of the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy). He served as a senior staff economist at the Council of Economic Advisers from 1979 to 1980.   Courant has authored half a dozen books, and over seventy papers covering a broad range of topics in economics and public policy. Most recently, his academic work has considered the economics of universities, the economics of libraries and archives, and the effects of new information technologies and other disruptions on scholarship, scholarly publication, and academic libraries. He is active in a number of national initiatives, including the Digital Public Library of America and the Authors Alliance.

Jeffrey Smith is a Professor of Economics at the University of Michigan and has an appointment at the Ford School. He received his PhD in Economics from the University of Chicago in 1996. Prior to joining the faculty at U-M in 2005, he was on the faculty at the University of Western Ontario from 1994 to 2001, and from 2001 to 2005 he was on the faculty at the University of Maryland. His research centers on experimental and non-experimental methods for the evaluation of interventions, with particular application to social and educational programs. He has also written papers examining the labor market effects of university quality and the use of statistical treatment rules to assign persons to government programs. Important publications include "Is the Threat of Reemployment Services More Effective than the Services Themselves?" (with Dan Black, Mark Berger, and Brett Noel) in the American Economic Review (2003); "The Economics and Econometrics of Active Labor Market Programmes" (with James Heckman and Robert LaLonde), Handbook of Labor Economics, Volume 3A (1999); "Does Matching Overcome LaLonde's Critique of Nonexperimental Methods?" (with Petra Todd), Journal of Econometrics (2005); and "Heterogeneous Program Impacts: Experimental Evidence from the PROGRESA Program" (with Habiba Djebbari), Journal of Econometrics (2008). He has consulted to governments in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Australia on evaluation issues.

About CIERS:

The objective of the Causal Inference in Education Research Seminar (CIERS) is to engage students and faculty from across the university in conversations around education research using various research methodologies. 

This seminar provides a space for doctoral students and faculty from the School of Education, Ford School of Public Policy, and the Departments of Economics, Sociology, Statistics, and Political Science to discuss current research and receive feedback on works-in-progress. Discourse between these schools and departments creates a more complete community of education scholars, and provides a networking opportunity for students enrolled in a variety of academic programs who share common research interests. Open to PhD students and faculty engaged in causal inference in education research.