Policy Topics

Ethics

Showing 1 - 30 of 179 results
Emeritus faculty

John R. Chamberlin

Professor Emeritus of Public Policy, Gerald R Ford School of Public Policy, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
John R. Chamberlin is a professor emeritus of political science and public policy. His research interests include ethics and public policy, professional ethics, and methods of election and representation. He taught the core course "Values, Ethics,…
Core faculty

Shobita Parthasarathy

Professor of Public Policy, Director of the Science, Technology, and Public Policy program.
Parthasarathy's research focuses on the comparative and international politics and policy related to science and technology. She is interested in how to develop innovation, and innovation policy, to better achieve public interest and social justice goals. Much of her previous work has focused on the governance of emerging science and technology, particularly those that have uncertain environmental, social, ethical, political, and health implications.
Core faculty

David E. Thacher

Associate Professor of Public Policy; Associate Professor of Urban Planning
As an associate professor of public policy and urban planning, Thacher’s research draws from philosophy, history, and the interpretive social sciences to develop and apply a humanistic approach to policy research. Most of his work has focused on criminal justice policy, where he has undertaken studies of order maintenance policing, the local police role in homeland security, community policing reform, the distribution of safety and security, prisoner re-entry, and criminal justice discretion.
Core faculty

Megan Tompkins-Stange

Assistant Professor of Public Policy
Tompkins-Stange is a scholar of education policy and philanthropy, focusing on the influence of private foundations on the politics of K-12 school reform.
PUBPOL 580

PUBPOL 580.001: Values & Ethics in Public Policy

Megan Tompkins-Stange
Tuesday, Thursday
/
Fall 2020
10:00-11:20 am EDT

This course seeks to make students sensitive to and articulate about the ways in which moral and political values come into play in the American policy process, particularly as they affect non-elected public officials who work in a world shaped by

PUBPOL 580.001

PUBPOL 580.001: Values & Ethics in Public Policy

Megan Tompkins-Stange
Tuesday, Thursday
/
Fall 2019
2:30-3:50 pm EDT

This course seeks to make students sensitive to and articulate about the ways in which moral and political values come into play in the American policy process, particularly as they affect non-elected public officials who work in a world shaped by

PUBPOL 580

PUBPOL 580.001: Values, Ethics, and Public Policy

John Ciorciari
Tuesday, Thursday
/
Winter 2018
8:30-10:00 am EDT

This course seeks to make students sensitive to and articulate about the ways in which moral and political values come into play in the American policy process, particularly as they affect non-elected public officials who work in a world shaped by

PUBPOL 495

PUBPOL 495.002: Policy Seminar: Utopianism

David Morse
Tuesday, Thursday
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Winter 2017
10:00-11:30 am EDT

"Utopia" in Greek means both "good place" and "no place"–a paradise that cannot be realized, existing only in our imaginations. This is why the term when used today is often meant pejoratively, to indicate that a plan is impossible.

PUBPOL 615

PUBPOL 615.001: Universities & Society

Thursday
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Winter 2017
4:00-6:00 pm EDT

The Evolving Bargain Between Research Universities and Society --- The role of the university as both 'servant and critic' of society is one of constant reinvention.

PUBPOL 580

PUBPOL 580.001: Values, Ethics, and Public Policy

David Thacher
Monday, Wednesday
/
Winter 2017
2:30-4:00 pm EDT

This course seeks to make students sensitive to and articulate about the ways in which moral and political values come into play in the American policy process, particularly as they affect non-elected public officials who work in a world shaped by

PUBPOL 662

PUBPOL 662.001: Global Corporate Social Responsibility

Marina Whitman
Tuesday, Thursday
/
Winter 2017
2:30-4:00 pm EDT

Course will examine the origins of the concept of CSR its meaning and motivations, and the shareholder-stakeholder controversy, where the latter include employees, communities (now defined globally) and, most recently, the global environment.