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robert stern

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Alan V. Deardorff festschrift compilation published

Aug 10, 2011
World Scientific Books published a compilation of materials from Alan V. Deardorff's festschrift as part of its Studies in International Economics series. The book, titled "Comparative Advantage, Growth, and the Gains from Trade and...

Perspectives on the WTO Doha Development Agenda Multilateral Trade Negotiations

Oct 21, 2005, 4:00-5:30 pm EDT
Weill Hall
'Perspectives on the WTO Doha Development Agenda Multilateral Trade Negotiations,' conference was hosted by the International Policy Center of the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, together with the Department of Economics and the Law School. The purpose of the conference was to provide a forum to discuss the most important issues to be addressed during the December 2005 Ministerial Meeting of the WTO in Hong Kong. Robert M.
Ford School

Systemic Implications of Transatlantic Regulatory Cooperation and Competition

May 8, 2008, 4:00-5:30 pm EDT
Weill Hall
The purpose of the conference is to explore a number of regulatory issues involving trade and related policies that cut across the economies of the United States and European Union and that have wider ramifications for the global trading system as a whole. An indication of the scope of the conference and the papers being commissioned is available via the links in the agenda, below. Attendance: Open to interested faculty, students, and the public.
Ford School

Quantitative Analysis of Newly Evolving Patterns of Japanese and U.S. International Trade: Fragmentation; Offshoring of Activities; and Vertical Intra-Industry Trade Conference

Oct 16, 2009, 8:30 am-5:15 pm EDT
Ross Business School, Classroom W0770 701 Tappan Street
Robert M. Stern, Professor of Economics and Public Policy in the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy and Department of Economics of the University of Michigan, is the conference director. The co-directors are Kyoji Fukao, Professor of Economics, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo, and Kozo Kiyota, Associate Professor of Economics, Yokohama National University.
Ford School