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Charles Shipan

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Faculty by courtesy

Charles R. Shipan

J. Ira and Nicki Harris Professor of Social Sciences
Shipan teaches and conducts research on political institutions and public policy. Current projects focus on the president's ability to change policy, whether elections can cause politicians to avoid passing good policies, and the effect of bipartisanship on public policy. His most recent book is Why Bad Policies Spread (and Good Ones Don’t).
In the Media

Shipan explains Michigan GOP divide

Jul 19, 2021 Detroit Free Press
The Michigan Republican Party is struggling to define itself in the shadow of former President Donald Trump. Some members want to cling to Trump and his rhetoric, while others are trying to distance themselves. Charles Shipan, the J. Ira and Nicki...
State & Hill

Health policy diffusion both horizontal and vertical

Dec 6, 2010
Across the nation, cities have been pioneers in restricting restaurant and workplace smoking, and making it harder for children to acquire cigarettes. As a political scientist, Professor Chuck Shipan’s work seeks to understand how these policies...

The Evolution of Cooperation & the Framing of Peace

May 16, 2013, 12:00 am EDT
Weill Hall
The Center for the Study of Complex Systems, The Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, and the Department of Political Science will be hosting a two day conference on the Evolution of Cooperation and The Framing of Peace. This conference will focus on the past and current research of Robert Axelrod, who has made substantial contributions to all three units.
Ford School

Presidential Power in the United States: Emerging Research

May 9, 2014, 8:30 am-5:00 pm EDT
Weill Hall
The President of the United States occupies a position of global importance, and the office of the presidency itself has grown in strength within the American political system. Nevertheless, the president and the executive branch often require the cooperation of other branches of government in order to decide upon and enact policy.
Ford School